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20121211
20121211
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
has not changed, only the time period has. that means japan must stay vigilant. >> japan's ruling party promised change. but it faces challenges, an economy dogged by uncertainty and disputes with neighbors over territory. voters now face a choice. who will they trust to guide their country forward? join us december 16th for "japan decides." >>> continued violence in afghanistan has cast a shadow over plans for the country to take over it's own security in 2013. the pentagon insists things are back on track. and uses phrase dramatically improved to describe the situation in a new report. we have a report from our bureau in bangkok. >> the u.s. department of defense has released its latest report on the on going battle with taliban in afghanistan. progress has been made, but much remains to be done. pressing issue, how to best train afghan forces to maintain security. the report released to the u.s. congress on monday. a key claim is that 76% of the country's population lives in areas where afghan police and troops maintain the leading role in security. it also states that attacks
will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china were sluggish in september as japanese cars fell out of favorite. sales have been growing for two straight months since october. >>> the leaders of iraq say they are ready to make their coury a mayor player in the global oil market. they will double and quadruple oil output. businesses from arrange the world are eyeing wi
some gross domestic problems. japan's gdp has contracted two quarters in a row, signaling it has entered recession. a recent territorial dispute with the chinese government and struggles following last year's tsunami continue to hurt japan's export market. an election next week in japan could have a large effect on fiscal policy. reports say delta is close to landing a deal that will give the airline a 49% stake in virgin atlantic. bloomberg reports talks between delta and singapore airlines, which is looking to sell its stake in virgin, are advancing. the deal is estimated to cost between $300 and $500 million. it could mean a step up for delta's business, due to virgin atlantic's high volume of premium passengers. apple and google reportedly are forming a rather odd alliance. the two rivals are making a joint bid for a bundle of kodak patents. according to bloomberg news, the combined bid is $500 million. kodak could get an $830 million loan to get out of bankruptcy by selling its patents. holiday hiring is on track to set a record this year. retailers have added more than 619,
to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
has taken place. now, the night before i went to bed i wasn't thinking about japan. i wasn't thinking about nuclear power. and now it's all-consuming. it just seems like we're in a period of time that's volatile from a geopolitical standpoint. it's volatile from an environment, nature standpoint. >> rose: jeff immelt for the hour. next. >> rose: general electric is the nation's largest industrial company. it employs over 300,000 people around the world. it makes everything from aircraft engines to power plant turbines to medical imaging equipment. the company has evolved over the last decade over jeff immeant's watch. he has led a global expansion and shed once treasured businesses such as plastics and insurance. in 2011, president obama named him to lead the council on jobs and competitiveness. last month, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to
. tracy: i remember when i was a kid they said japan was buying of rockefeller center. japan's by to take over the world. that never happened. >> no, but japan was our ally. we could deal with the japanese on a reasonable basis. the problem with china is that it sees itself as supplanting the united states. has been very hostile and aggressive in recent years. it's trying to push the u.s. out of asia. they are not our friend, and so we don't want to give them a foothold in our economy. tracy: that being said, how do we stop this? do we not allow these deals to happen? in the u.s. is basically putting a defense. >> the chinese put up a fence. we couldn't buy if it were a chinese enterprise. we can stop this because the committee on foreign investment in the u.s. has the final say on sensitive acquisitions. and so they can stop the acquisition. tracy: that probably should have >> they should. tracy: thank you for being here. the coming collapse of china. it is coming. >> it is. tracy: we want to know what you think about all this. here is our question tonight. is the u.s. still a superpower
's threatened by this. such a missile could reach alaska, hawaii, south korea or japan. that's one of the reasons that all of those countries have taken precautionary measures, the u.s. sending four warships to the region, south korea has a warship observing all the events. japan activating its anti-missile shield. the plan launched in provocation in direct defines of the security council. the state department said we have the un security council statement which strongly condemned their last launch and made clear that the council was determined to take action if there is a further launch and we stand by that, end quote. just what action the un might take remains unclear but the tightening of sanctions is almost a sure bet and given that much of the technology for north korea's missile program is imported, a stricter ban of technology sports from around the world may be in the offing. >> shepard: technical problems is the reason given for the delay. it sounds like a lot of analysts believe that could be a cover. >> reporter: that's what couple of south korean analysts are telling th
or medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics went to eight winners from the u.s., japan, france, and britain. >> the nobel prize for economics was jointly awarded to allan ross and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand -- alvin roth and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand. 89-year-old lloyd shapley, professor emeritus at the university of california, received a standing ovation. >> while the eu is celebrating winning the nobel peace prize, one of its largest member states has been plunged into crisis. >> first data appeared that italy was facing the prospect -- first, it appeared that italy was facing the prospect of uncertainty as mario monti appeared to be on the prospect of resigning. that pushed the stock market into a downward slide. >> in the last couple of hours, prime minister mario monti has come out and said he is not planning to step down in the near future after all, and that the nervous reaction in the markets should not be dramatized. >> investors are already nervous about what mario monti's early departure could spell for the eurozon
japan and nobody goes on the street and says open the doors. here's the saddest thing i've ever seen in my life. >> everybody only gets two minutes. if you could finish your thought, that would be great. >> two minutes? i've been here 57 years, lady. you say valley will be here monday and people are out sick. you are not respecting the sbreg integrity of the folks already there. maybe you ought to just stop and let us grow and flow. >> thank you, next speaker. >> good afternoon, supervisors, my name is jake crafford. if you look at the fillmore district and compare it to divisidero and vezation valley, you are having a lot of power shaping our neighborhood deciding what businesses go into the retail spaces, what organizations come to service our community. in the last year and a half there's literally been two meetings in our neighborhood regarding the $800,000, two meetings, and one of the things we agreed to with the mayor's office when they came in, they would have monthly meetings and they would have it monthly, that way when you have a important topic the community has an
, it sends it to a screen that shows you what the item looks like. they're being tested in japan. in this case giving the example using tights. when you pick up a pair, it shows you what these tights look like on a model. >> you can't really try that stuff on. it's in plastic, seemed wrap. you know? you have no idea how it's going to look once you get it home. >> or where the print's going to end up. like this, you can see exactly where it's going to be. i think it's really cool and i think it will be good if you can apply it to all kinds of different thing, makeup what color it will look like on. or shirt. it's not going to show what it will look like on you but kind of cool to see a catalogue on the spot. >>> a finely scented man is like cat --. that is true. that it true. >> and axe, the men's fragrance spray claims there's only one side effect when using their axe body spray, and that's coverage. >> the morning after. you smell so good to the woman, you just can't shake it. according to the latest ad, they have a solution. >> oh? >> you have to saw your arm off. >> that's wha
is there was a sequence of transactions in a bank in japan in which they brought sequentially numbered travelers checks into this one little bank in japan totaling $290 million. no one seemed to have any idea where it was coming from. it all traced back to a guy in russia who claimed to be a used car salesman. >> woodruff: a used car salemans. >> with $290 million in sequentially numbered travelers checks. >> woodruff: isn't there supposed to be internal monitoring going on inside a bank? >> right. the basic principle is called know your customer. since 9/11 and since a whole bunch of other money laundering issues have surfaced the u.s. government has really tried to make the banks tighter and more careful in terms of who they're doing business with, who they're moving money for. what seems to have happened repeatedly according to the investigators in the h.s.b.c. case is no one was actually questioned. >> woodruff: now it was clear that the investigation on the part of the government has been going on for several years. what brought all this to light? how did it surface? >> it actually started in 2007
and science exams given globally singapore south korea and japan outperformed u.s. fourth and eighth grade students of the 2011 trends in international mathematics and science study. despite that u.s. students still rank among the top performers of 60 countries that administer the exam. >> we will take a break it is 612 right now and we will be back with more headlines and a moment. a live look of the golden gate bridge as we go. traffic is beginning to build, the weather nice and mild. it is cold, really cold in some spots like 30 degrees. a pulitzer forecast coming up. a couple of developing stories happening live right now live look at a florida courtroom right now the case with george it said zimmerman. he is in court right now charge of the shooting killing of 17 year- old trade on martin. in the hearing today they're asking the judge to and there are men's 24-hour dps monitoring. the neighborhood watch volunteer has been out on bond and a judge today is expected to year at least eight emotions in his case. zimmerman claims he shot the teen and self-defense as that to go on trial in j
to that. now, i had friend from japan, for example, come over to see me in san francisco and he saw all the bars on the windows. "what are all these bars for?" i said, "that's to keep the thieves out." he say, "you guys are living with--you got the bars on the wrong side-- bars are on the thieves." "oh, no, no. the thieves have their rights, man, you know?" and other thing is we get so used to it, so used to it. first, the bar on this one as ain't before, you know, the whole city is a barricade, you know? something that happens slowly, slowly, slowly, you get used to and you accept. it's like the nuclear missiles, right? first a few, right? then a few more, then a few more gradually they-- living in a whole world ready to blow up and well, you kinda get used to it. [laughter] small enough doses. something happens in san francisco at fisherman's wharf all the time that kinda bothers me. it's like auschwitz there. auschwitz. you get down there you wanna get your crabs, you wanna get your lobsters or you go to fisherman's wharf and you wanna order a nice lobster dinner. now how do you-- wh
and japan were rubble so we thought that was the natural order of things. it wasn't. and when the other industrial countries recovered we got world competition as we have. we ran into bankruptcies. chrysler now twice. we see that in the southern states where the transplants are without the unions. they weren't the ones who went bankrupt last -- in 2008 and 2009. so it really is a choice. it's a tough choice. and i sympathize with the unions but the fact is that in the global economy where you have to compete on wages and other elements, of the units of production, can you either have, you know, high wages with low employment or you can, as obama would say, spread around the wealth. the fact is that in the right-to-work states, unemployment is 6.9%. >> we have a graphic that shows right-to-work vs. non-right to work statements on employment, go ahead. >> and in the other stays the non-right-to-work it's 8.7. so you can choose to have fewer workers who enjoy higher inflated unnatural, if you like, wangs on uncompetitive wages. or competitive wages and more people employed. more people wit
'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-80345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control cause i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 20. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and a obal specialist tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 will help y
of the war that ended with the united states, and power europe and japan on their backs to the u.s. dollar what as the international system currency did not make it a very vital it's not just fun to deal it's the settlement in world war ii and the superpower status in the international economy. the dominant party might be called regime party because they are able to use their political strength to carry forward the basic theme around which the political settlements were organized. jefferson's party looks to the blues and democracy expansion and the freedom and capitalism, fdr the themes of national regulation and internationalism and in this sense the united states has had a two-party system rather one-and-a-half party system assisting the regime party and the competitive forced to adapt is now on the position. the competitors in the 1840's that democrats after the civil war and the republicans in the postwar era won the national elections but only after accepting the legitimacy with the basic political fema established by the regime party. it's interesting to read the platforms and the de
long distance transportation options. we need to catch up to germany, france and japan. just heard this morning that japan is celebrating their 50th anniversary of their bullet train. we cannot allow china to surpass us in our next generation of infrastructure. tourists from across the world will visit our high-spieled rail to marvel at our engineering and technological prowess. this is not just about transportation, but about changing the revitalization along the cities and routes. in conclusion, it's clear that i support the high-speed rail in california. the federal program will help make it possible. what we need now is vision, what we need now is leadership, what we need now is a belief that the people of california and this country want us to invest in this type of transportation option. thank you, mr. chairman. i yield back my time. >> thank you. i thank you both the members for joining us, and you're welcome now to join us be you'd like and stay for questions. we'll excuse you at this time as we bring secretary lahood up who's our next witness. our second panel, because thi
and growing. growing in the suburbs. that's the latest trend in poverty. >> i'll give you an example. japan. i lived in japan five years and they had a very good early childhood education program. there's very limited class difference and i think that that has worked pretty well and, you know, bringing, everybody prepared to participate in the labor force. >> just bring this up, again, i think there are some people who don't watch the show regularly, but, of course, they heard that nick was coming on and like one direction. >> you should see my twitter, it's going wild. >> nick crikristof is on, my far was unemployed in the 1970s and $40 in mississippi, once a week, allowed him to buy groceries for his kids and put a tank of gas in the car. so, these programs, there are extremes and there are problems, but mike said, this won't break the country, but certainly destroying lives. >> there are, you know, blind kids who desperately need their families at home and that support makes a huge diffdiffer. the problem is when you have much more ambiguous situations and parents think they can gain the cy
out over 90% of new treasury supply again. so on this is a big deal. given what japan is doing, there are six countries with negative nominal rates already. >> okay. we'll see juicy first half of next year. but kevin ferry, thank you for that. and, joe, before i go, i need to just make one quick comment to you. i said to the audience -- i don't know if you heard this. maybe you were wincing when i said it. i said happy monday. did you hear that earlier in the program? >> no. >> someone e-mailed me and i realized today is tuesday. >> you know how you can guard against that, though? by -- >> never saying -- >> for not wasting the sue pure if a loose anchor speak that -- >> you think happy monday is anchor speak? >> yeah, i do. people don't need that. or happy tuesday or anything. they know what day it is, most people, he hopefully. >> except me. >> yeah. you don't need to remind them. >>> in our corporate headlines on this wednesday -- i said on this wednesday -- ftx is in exclusive talk toes buy rival ga ardner. bids range from the low to mid 70s. the spx offer is assumed likely
was the third state. off i wants to japan to recruit nissan. we had virtually no rot owe jobs in tennessee at the time. they took a look at the united states and a map of the united states at night shows that most of the people live in the east, a map with the lights on. most of the people live in the east and the center of the markets where you're going to be if you're making big, heavy thifntle the center oheavething. they looked aggressively at tennessee, kentucky, georgia. then they looked at something else. every state north of us did not have a right-to-work law. so niece saso nissan came to te. the united auto workers came to tennessee. they a different labor environment there. the workers at the saturn plan are members of the united autoworkers. but it is a right-to-work statement and over the last 30 years there are probably a dozen large assembly plants in the southeastern part of the united states sms there are about 1,000 suppliers in our state. what has been the effect of the arrival of the art owe industry in tennessee? it attracted, aamong other things, by our right-to-work
for japan. there is something wrong with this picture. we'll have the details in a moment. please don't forget. free market capitalism is still the best path to prosperity. it may not entirely show itself in this fiscal cliff fix, but the fix may be coming. i'm kudlow. we'll be right back. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> u.s. tax dollar funded battery marker a-123 systems is up for sale. the winning bid goes to -- china. so i asked was red china rising why u.s. taxpayers have to finance their battery companies. here's ann lee, author of "what the u.s. can learn from china," professor of nyu and visiting professor from beijing university and author kwof "death by china" and cnbc contributor. ann, let me go to you first. if we, the u.s. taxpayer and government are dumb enough to build a goofy batte
from places like singapore, finland, japan, and south korea just to name a few. the study follows the much talked about "new york times" column by nicholas chrisoff who visited the appalachian hills of kentucky and found run disturbing reasons why some of america's poorest children are illiterate. nick joins me now live from the "times" to explain. so you go to jackson, kentucky, and people are running literacy programs there but tlrl parents who don't want their kids to learn to read. it just defies all logic and all tradition here in the united states of wanting our kids to have a better life. what's going on? >> well, it's heartbreaking because there is, in effect, an incentive for parents to try to gain the system and have their kids be diagnosed with an intellectual disability because then they can get payments each month until that child turns 18 under the ssi system. and so, you know, there's no doubt that ssi support is a lifeline to many parents with kids who truly are disabled. but also, according to people there, there's no doubt that there are a lot of fuzzier cases wh
out from current trends. what's in place will go on forever. we did that with japan 30 years ago. got that one wrong. maybe we shouldn't be extrapolating like this with china. gregg: the other thing that is very conspicuous here is the enormous trade imbalance with china. our trade deficit with china has tripled over the last 10 years. point of fact i just looked it up today. we export 7%. they export 23% to the united states. isn't that a job killer for americans? >> yes it is. there is no question about it. many of the jobs which our fathers and grandfathers had in the united states left a generation ago or 10 years ago, they left for china and that's basic in the relationship between china and the united states economically at this moment. that doesn't change if china becomes the world's number one economy. it might even get worse. gregg: yeah. and china is now overtaken the united states as the world's largest trading partner. >> yes. gregg: we'll talk about that with senator charles grassley coming up next hour. stuart varney, thanks very much. >> thanks, gregg. martha: this whol
of competition. some from japan. many in cars being built in america in nonunion states by nonunion american workers. ever since that time consumers have voted for the competitors products. as long as you have a competitive that isn't all that much you have to do to raise costs for businesses. lori: it all sounds great and makes perfect sense, but you look at the pictures we see right now in the capital, union members serious about losing the right to work status. you wonder that volatility could have a ripple effect ultimately interceding the economy. >> probably not. a majority support this move by 10 to 15-point margin. we just had a ballot initiative in michigan to prevent the legislature from passing this exact kind of law. they defeated it by 15-point margin. the polls and election results show most michigan voters support what is going on. lori: thank you for your time and your analysis on this union issue. one i think we'l will stick arod for a while. melissa: breaking news now. delta stocks spiking on news that elder and virgin atlantic are coming to a deal. a stake currently held b
-800-345-2550 then tonight, m trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities arou theorld tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their glal research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i alsoave access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialisists 24/. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 20. d#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and a global specialist tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 will he
from international achievement exams find that students in singapore, south korea, and japan outperform u.s. fourth and eighth grade student in the to about 11 trend in international mathematics and science study. despite the u.s. students do rank among the top form as assisting countries that administer the exam. >> our live look this morning shows hazy conditions. foggy in seven to go. traffic beginning to build. we will get an update on both your weather and traffic coming welcome back to the kron 4 morning news. watching a few light of cents. here is a look inside a florida courtroom. >> attorneys for the florida man charged with shooting and killing 17 year olds trayvon martin r as it as a judge to in their class 24- hour gps monitoring. never of watch volunteer george zimmerman has been out on bond and a judge today is expected here at least a new motions in this case. zimmerman, who claimed he shot the teen in self- defense, is set to go to trial in june. >> national labor unions hold their right to work rally ahead of the house and senate vote on becoming the controversy right t
generation of on japan new hours because of our system of higher education. the staff that we have our worldwide brands because of the innovations that they have made and that they continue to make. the role of investment and research. it plays a vital role to that. because of the innovation ecosystem. it is vital in the united states. it can be fragile if we make long-term decisions. we are having this discussion today. we are excited by this conversation. i will start the conversation with president drew faust of harvard. then we will have a panel, moderated by al hunt of bloomberg news. he has many years and many stories of washington appear that panel will be joined by susan molinari of google, glenn hutchins was made very smart decisions in technology and understands the role of technology companies in the global economy. jonathan marino has written extensively about the united states investment in science and what it has meant for us on a whole host of issues. we will sort of a conversation with drew faust. \ let me spend a minute talking about that. drew, i am particularly enthu
in japan, in the united states they immediately want to say, what is the president doing? what is he saying? what's the policy? what's the action? 30 years ago that would have been one of the questions, but it wouldn't be a central question. presidents have -- it's amazing what they can do. i think obama has more power than bush had, for instance. >> and yet i believe it's your view that we know less about our presidents, less about the inner workings about the white house. why is that? is that our fault? >> well, it is in part our fault. and i think the message managers in the white house get better and better and more skillful. that it's a barrier often, and you have to -- god knows how much time i spent breaking down -- breaking that logjam in the white house saying i'm doing this book. i got these stories. i got these memos. i got these notes. ok. we'll answer questions. it's not something where they're standing there on pennsylvania avenue saying to the reporters, come on, we're dying to have you hold us accountable for what we're doing. >> you do manage to break people down. what if t
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)